Air Purifiers

Your air purifier shopping guide

Air purifiers and air purifier filters were originally developed for use in laboratories, but air purifiers for homes are becoming increasingly common as concerns grow about allergies and pollution. A good home air purifier should help improve the air quality in your home, but before you purchase one, you should consider what model of personal air purifier is right for you.

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Types of Indoor Air Purifiers

There are many different types of indoor air purifiers. Not only do they vary in size, but they work differently, too. Essentially, all air purifiers work by sucking in air, removing contaminants from it and then introducing the clean air back into the room. The method used for actually purifying the air is what separates one air purifier from another.

There are many different types of room air purifiers available: the ozone air purifier, the ultraviolet air purifier, the electronic air purifier - even the ionic air purifier. They all offer different advantages, and each may work better for removing certain pollutants. HEPA air purifiers are typically the best air purifier for removing small particles from the air. This makes a HEPA air purifier ideal for use as an allergy relief air purifier. (Check with a physician before purchasing any allergy air purifier.)

Size and Installation

Once you've reasoned out the best type of air filters and purifiers for your home, the next thing to consider is size and installation. It is possible to get a portable air purifier, also known as a room air purifier, but more permanent options are available as well. If air quality is of serious concern to you, it may be worth installing an air purifier directly into your ventilation system. If you choose to do this, make sure you factor installation and maintenance requirements into the air purifier cost.

Location

Room air purifiers can help improve air quality in any indoor space, but which type and size you get will depend largely on where you plan to use it and what your particular needs are. The germicidal qualities of a UV air purifier can be beneficial for someone with asthma (again, check with a physician before purchase), while an ion air purifier is a cost-effective solution for a home with lower levels of indoor air pollution. If you plan to use the unit in your bedroom while you sleep, you'll definitely want to consider purchasing a silent air purifier.

Whatever your choice, research it carefully, and be sure to factor in maintenance, filter and energy costs. You can't put a price on clean air, but you can make sure you get the most for your money.